The Kingdom of Morocco
Morocco is an Islamic country with fascinating landscape and amazing tour destinations that millions of travellers visit every day.
The Kingdom of Morocco is situated in the northwest corner of Africa and shares coastlines with the North Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. Algeria and Western Sahara are the southern and eastern land boundaries, respectively.

The Kingdom of Morocco

The Kingdom of Morocco

The Atlas Mountains separate the temperate coast from the inhospitable Sahara. Rainfall is unreliable and insufficient to provide all the water required by the population.People and CultureMoroccans are Arab and Berber, and the majority of the population is Muslim. In North Africa, the Berbers have existed for centuries. Many Berbers still reside in the highlands and speak the Berber language, but today they are migrating to cities in search of employment.

Moroccans appreciate mint tea with added sugar. People take their time preparing and sipping tea with their families and visitors. The pace in cities is slightly quicker than in rural areas. On the littoral plain, 57 percent of the population resides in cities such as Fez, Casablanca, and Marrakech.

Mosques with attractive minarets and bazaars are prevalent in Morocco. Medinas are the ancient medieval districts of cities. Ancient fortresses known as kasbahs are constructed from riverbank clay and palm-tree fibers.

Children are required to attend school between the ages of 7 and 15, but many children labor alongside their parents and cannot attend school. Numerous women never attain an education.

Government of Morocco

Government of The Kingdom of Morocco

The monarch of Morocco is King Mohammed VI, who has governed since 1999. The sultan appointed Abbas el-Fassi as prime minister. The monarch is involved in all decisions, and he has moved the country closer to democracy, but it is still far from the European and North American democracies. The legal system in Morocco is founded on Islamic law, as it is a Muslim country.
GOVERNMENT The monarch of Morocco is King Mohammed VI, who has governed since 1999.

The sultan appointed Abbas el-Fassi as prime minister. All decisions involve the monarch, and he has moved the country closer to democracy. The legal system in The Kingdom of Morocco is founded on Islamic law, as it is a Muslim country.

The Kingdom of Morocco is traditional home of the indigenous peoples now known as Berbers (self-name Imazighen; singular, Amazigh). The area was formerly under Carthage’s rule but later became the Roman Empire’s westernmost province.

Following the Arab conquest of North Africa in the late seventh century, the region became known as the Maghrib (Arabic for “the West”), and the majority of its inhabitants converted to Islam. In the 11th century, the Almoravids, the first indigenous Amazigh dynasty of North Africa, seized control of an empire extending from Andalusian (southern) Spain to sections of sub-Saharan Africa.

Beginning in the late 15th century, European attempts to establish permanent footholds in Morocco were largely repulsed, but the country subsequently became the subject of Great Power politics in the 19th century. Morocco became a French protectorate in 1912, but in 1956 it resumed its independence. It is the only monarchy in North Africa at present.

Despite its rapid modernization and rising standard of living, the country retains a significant amount of its ancient architecture and even more of its traditional customs. Casablanca, the largest city in The Kingdom of Morocco and a significant Atlantic Ocean port, is an industrial and commercial hub. Rabat, the capital, is located a brief distance north of the Atlantic coast. Other port communities include Tangier, located on the Strait of Gibraltar; Agadir, located on the Atlantic; and Al-Hocema, located on the Mediterranean Sea. The souks, or open-air markets, in Fès are said to be among the finest in all of North Africa. Morocco merits the praise of a native son, the medieval traveler Ibn Baah, who proclaimed, “It is the finest of countries, for its fruits are abundant, and its running water and nourishing food are never depleted.

11 Top Destinations in Morocco

11 Top Destinations in The Kingdom of Morocco

From the sparkling waters of the Mediterranean to the sandy expanses of the Sahara, Morocco has for millennia captivated and enticed travelers.
As a result of The Kingdom of Morocco’s central position for trade with the rest of Africa, its Berber traditions have been permeated with numerous foreign influences. Discover each of Morocco’s cities, from French to Spanish and others in between, whether they are cosmopolitan metropolises or traditional medieval communities. Here is a list of the top Moroccan cities to help you plan your next vacation.
From the sparkling waters of the Mediterranean to the sandy expanses of the Sahara, Morocco has for millennia captivated and enticed travelers.

As a result of Morocco’s central position for trade with the rest of Africa, its Berber traditions have been permeated with numerous foreign influences. Discover each of The Kingdom of Morocco’s cities, from French to Spanish and others in between, whether they are cosmopolitan metropolises or traditional medieval communities. Here is a list of the top Moroccan cities to help you plan your next vacation.

1. Asilah

Asilah is an artistic city whose walls are adorned with vibrant murals. The ancient fortified coastal city is a lively and entertaining location where the cultures of Spain and Morocco converge.
Explore the old city on foot, and you will find creativity and tradition permeating every street. The seaside promenade is ideal for a leisurely bike ride past the charming cafes and ocean vistas.

2. Larache

Domestic tourists swarm this laid-back summer city during the summer months. The River Loukas flows gently through the city of Larache, and the incredible ruins of Lixus, where the legendary Gardens of the Hesperides are said to be located, are located nearby.
Do not be surprised if you stumble upon tapas bars and Spanish churches in the Spanish section of this metropolis.

3. Casablanca

Everyone is familiar with the city of Casablanca as the colonial setting of the 1942 romantic film, but the city of today does not quite capture that enchanted, dreamlike atmosphere. Instead, modern Casablanca is a commercial powerhouse; the port city’s significance makes it Morocco’s economic center.
You can still take a stroll through Casablanca’s historic old downtown to learn about the city’s past. The architecture of the Moors is infused with European forms and designs. If you really want to harken back to black-and-white films, visit Rick’s Cafe, a recreation of the film’s famous bar (it’s a reconstruction, but we can fantasize, right?).

4. Tangier

The gateway to Africa, at least for Europeans, has a peculiar and turbulent history. During the 1950s and 1960s, the city’s renowned International Zone was a magnet for all manner of bizarre and curious characters, attracting many writers and artists and inspiring numerous novels and songs.
Tangiers still possesses remnants of its fantastical past, and outside factors have influenced its aesthetic. With new businesses thriving and money pouring in, the city has undergone significant development and is now an excellent example of The Kingdom of Morocco’s future.

5. Agadir

Agadir, a thriving port city, is a vacation destination in its own right. After a devastating earthquake in 1960 destroyed a large portion of Agadir, including its most historical areas, the city was rebuilt and is now significantly less attractive than Morocco’s many intricate old towns.

However, Agadir rose from the ashes to become a flourishing seaside resort with a correspondingly relaxed atmosphere. The laid-back beachfront promenade of the city is ideal for days spent meandering and living like a local. Stop at one of the food vendors for a snack and strike up a conversation with some of the friendly locals.

6. Essaouira

Essaouira is a tranquil coastal city with an undeniably European atmosphere. Once under French protectorate, which led to a blending of cultures and architectural styles, the 1960s saw the arrival of hippies, musicians, and travelers. As a result, it grew accustomed to foreigners and is now a popular destination for tourists who wish to spend time exploring the gorgeous medina.
Essaouira has beautiful sand beaches, but the strong gusts make sunbathing impossible. Water-sports enthusiasts, however, recognize the benefits of the wind and gather on Essaouira’s beaches during the summer to practice windsurfing.

The harbor and old city walls add depth to the city’s history, and its narrow alleys and ancient streets make it the ideal location to get lost and uncover new and intriguing secrets concealed within the walls.

7. Rabat

Rabat, the capital of Morocco, is situated on the banks of the Bouregreg River. It is renowned for its magnificent Islamic architecture. Additionally, the city has strong connections to its French past and, as it is situated on the Atlantic coast, a distinct European coastal town atmosphere. The Kasbah of Rabat is located in the fortified town center.
It is a wonderful place to relax and take in the atmosphere. Stroll to St. Peter’s Cathedral and take in its bizarre art-deco style; afterwards, enjoy a cup of mint tea at one of the many cafés.

8. Meknes

The ancient metropolis of Meknes, which dates back to the eleventh century, was once the imperial capital of Morocco. The Sultan at the time developed the city by constructing massive walls and doors to secure it, as well as ornate Moorish-Spanish structures.

Numerous monuments display the city’s historic fusion of European and Islamic styles. Both the mosaic-tiled Bab Mansour Leleuj and the Bab Mansour Leleuj are breathtakingly gorgeous. The mausoleum of Sultan Moulay Ismal, who made Meknes his capital, is a display of royal authority with fountains and gardens.

9. Ouarzazate

Ouarzazate, the portal to the Sahara Desert, is located south of the High Atlas Mountains. The enormous Taourirt Kasbah, a fortified palace from the 19th century, dominates this tiny and dusty desert city. The estate offers breathtaking views of the red, mountainous landscape. It is so distinctive that it has been utilized in numerous films.

There are numerous hotels and tiny, reasonably priced restaurants in the city itself. The city’s location also facilitates day trips to local attractions such as the Ait Benhaddou Kasbah, which has been meticulously preserved.

10. Fes

Fez, the former capital of the Kingdom of Morocco, is rich in culture and history. The city is well-known for its small, red headwear, but it also offers a wealth of other attractions. The iconic medina of Fez is a vast pedestrianized area that exudes atmosphere and history. Many visitors may find it entirely overwhelming, while others fall in love with the lively atmosphere.

Those who are courageous enough to navigate the city’s narrow alleys will discover two Islamic institutions, or madrasas. Both Bou Inania and Al Attarine, which date to the 14th century, have intricately carved cedar faces and ornate tiling.

The 11th-century Chouara Tannery is one of the world’s earliest and has been producing leather for generations of merchants; keep an eye out for it in the bustling marketplace.

11. Marrakech

Marrakech, one of the four imperial cities of The Kingdom of Morocco, has been an important trading center for many years. The importance of the city’s location to the trade of commodities into the country has shaped its character. Observe the iconic Koutoubia Mosque, which dates back to the 12th century and is a symbol of the ancient city. The exquisite Bahia Palace from the 19th century also stands out for its extravagant design.

Marrakech is a hectic and busy metropolis. Most people find Jemaa el-Fnaa, the city’s primary marketplace in the medina, to be hot and crowded. Everything and anything, from primates to musical instruments, is for sale.

Traders cry out to customers to taunt and entice them; bartering is the norm. As night falls, steaming food stalls take over the central plaza. Despite appearances, the city becomes an even more animated, dynamic, and ebullient travel destination.

Our Morocco Trips

Jewish Heritage Tour morocco tours
10 Days
$5760

A Jewish Heritage Tour in Morocco can only be started after introducing the history of Moroccan Jews in Morocco, which...

View Details